2019-09-06

Who accelerates efforts to eliminate cervical cancer in Southeast Asia


Regular screening by health professionals is key to eliminating cervical cancer. Pan American health organization
Regular screening by health professionals is key to eliminating cervical cancer.
September 6, 2019
Health and hygiene
Cervical cancer is the third most common cancer in southeast Asia. The world health organization today urged countries in the region to accelerate efforts to eliminate cervical cancer by 2030.
Worldwide, cervical cancer remains one of the most serious threats to women's lives. Cervical cancer is a major public health problem in southeast Asia and is the third most common cancer in the region. In 2018, 158,000 new cases were reported in southeast Asia and 95,766 people died from the disease.

At the 72nd session of the who regional committee for south-east Asia in Delhi, Poonam Khetrapal Singh, who regional director for south-east Asia, said countries in the region needed to provide vaccination, screening, testing and treatment services to every woman to address the growing problem of cervical cancer.

Vaccination can prevent cervical cancer. Pan American health organization/world health organization photo by Jane Dempster
Vaccination can prevent cervical cancer.

Tackling cervical cancer risk factors and reducing their prevalence has been a major priority for who in the region since 2014. All countries in the region are taking steps to screen for and treat pre-cancer. Four countries -- Bhutan, maldives, Sri Lanka and Thailand -- have introduced vaccines nationwide.

Cervical cancer is caused by the human papillomavirus (HPV). Vaccination, early detection, early treatment and palliative care against human papillomavirus have proven to be effective strategies for cervical cancer.

Southeast Asian countries are working to meet global goals: 90 percent of girls should be fully vaccinated against HPV by age 15; Seventy percent of women were screened by high-precision tests at the ages of 35 and 45; By 2030, 90 percent of women with cervical cancer will have access to treatment and care.



World health organization